Detectorists’ Dreams DO Come True! Silver Coin Hoard Found with the Garrett AT Pro

One lucky detectorist is keeping the dream alive for all of us who hope to find a coin hoard! Known as “Aquachigger” in his videos and metal detecting forums, this avid treasure hunter often searches rivers and streams. He spotted a river where he believed war relics would turn up, and started his shallow-water hunt. Aquachigger quickly hit on several silver coins in one concentrated area. Because the river floor here is bedrock, metals cannot sink any lower. This is perfect for uncovering coins, relics and gold. In his You Tube video that you can watch below: “OMG! I Found A Huge Silver Treasure Hoard Metal Detecting!” Aquachigger credits his Garrett AT Pro detector and Garrett Pro-Pointer for quickly signaling the silver coins. There was so much fence wire and lots of nails, he figures another detector may have passed right over the silver.

178 Silver Coins Found with the Garrett AT Pro!

Aquachigger’s Garrett AT Pro emitted a high pitch—with target ID reads from 89-90’s for silver. The AT Pro displayed 30’s when it passed over iron, making it easy to pinpoint the silver coins. After 5 or 6 trips to this riverbed hot spot, his total haul was 178 silver coins! The video is a worthwhile watch, as Aquachigger lays out all of his coins and explains what they are. A majority of the silver coin hoard includes U.S. halves, with the remaining pieces being Spanish 8 Reales, 5 franc coins and foreign (Brazil and Peru coins). It’s also interesting to read the comments about where this detectorist searched, how to find coins and how much the coins are worth. You can be next in a successful treasure quest!

MetalDetector.com’s 2017 Winter Sale

Start your OWN treasure hunting adventures with a metal detector of your own! During MetalDetector.com’s 2017 Winter Sale, you’ll find the lowest prices of the year on the most popular metal detectors and accessories. This includes the Garrett AT Pro!

 

Coin Hunting – Get Started with Your NEW Metal Detector!

Fisher F22 Weatherproof Metal Detector

Fisher F22 Weatherproof Metal Detector

Excited to go out treasure hunting with your new metal detector? Hunting for coins is a GREAT way to get familiar with your new detector—and enjoy success! Coins are the perfect target for first-time detectorists of all ages. There are millions of coins waiting to be discovered all around us. According to the late, famous detectorist and author, Charles Garrett, “ An experienced coin hunter can find 5,000 coins per year. Anyone can search for coins and quickly discover the best places to find them.” Among these places are parks, fields, beaches, around buildings, in construction areas, rural areas and even in your own backyard. Old, valuable coins are as abundant as newer clad coins, so they are definitely worth searching for! And surprisingly, gold coins continue to be discovered.

Target Identification—Coins

Most new metal detectors (if not ALL), have an LCD display which indicates which type of coin is being signaled. For example, the Whites Coinmaster entry-level model shows you whether you’ve found a nickel, dime, quarter, silver dollar or a junk target (such as foil or a nail). Other models indicate silver, gold or iron, with specific Target ID numbers that tell you which type of coin is underfoot. For example, the Fisher F22 has a Target ID screen that ranges from Fe (iron) to 10. Nickels show up on the screen as a “3,” a penny registers as zinc “5,” dimes are “6,” quarters are “7,” and half dollars are “8.” Being able to read your targets ahead of time, then test the Target ID accuracy is a great way to get familiar with your metal detector. Your detector manual will also detail your display screen and Target Identification conductivity bar.

Here’s a helpful article about to get started coin hunting: “Tips for Finding Coins in your own Neighborhood. Happy New Year and we hope you love your new hobby!

“Is This an Important Relic or Coin?” How to Identify Treasures Found

Learn more about this metal detecting find and your own found treasures in this helpful article.

Learn more about this metal detecting find and your own found treasures in this helpful article.

It’s exciting when you actually dig up a metal treasure, but frequently you don’t even know what it is – especially if you’ve found a relic! It probably looks ancient and valuable, but what is it? Experts advise not to tamper with your target too much before you know what it is. For instance, don’t scrub dirt off abrasively or use soap and water right off the bat. There are hundreds of metal detecting experts and communities who can help you identify items.

The Art of Identifying Treasures

When you find your first artifacts, you obviously want to know what they are! Before you know how to clean your find, you need to identify it. Ask a fellow detectorist for help. There are other resources, as well. Many museums have identification facilities. Check to see if any museums in your area offer this service. Another great reason to visit a museum is you will see tons of artifacts and be able to relate items when you make your own discoveries. Antique stores and coin dealers are also very useful to detectorists. They can help you identify finds; dealers often publish coin lists which you will likely reference often. Metal detecting books and magazines are beneficial to most detecting hobbyists. For example, experts recommend the book, “Whitman’s Official Red Book: A Guide Book of United States Coins” for identifying coins. MetalDetector.com offers a huge selection of metal detecting books, magazines and videos. You can find a book specifically geared towards Civil War relics, if that is your niche. Treasure Hunting magazines typically publish a monthly “Question & Answer” section in which readers’ finds are identified by experts. By the way, if you do buy metal detecting magazine, save them for your archive. It’s a great way to build up your own reference library.

Ask Mark Parker- Magazine Q & A Example

The metal detecting magazine Western & Eastern Treasures features a monthly column called “Ask Mark Parker.” Relic and coin expert Mark Parker selects photos from hobbyists interested in identifying their finds. He researches each find and provides detailed insight as to what it is, as well as its estimated value. One reader dug up an old brass lock in Colorado engraved “St. Louis” on both sides. He was interested in any information about his find.

Mark Parker’s response, “Your warded padlock dates from the early 1900s, and although there are no maker’s marks, the style is very similar to that of locks made by the E. T. Fraim Co. of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. As for the “St. Louis” name, it’s been suggested that this is one of a number of locks issued to cash in on the enormous interest and enthusiasm surrounding the St. Louis World’s Fair, or Louisiana Purchase Exposition, held in 1904. It’s a fairly common but collectable little item, usually retailing around $20.”

Identifying your treasure is among the most exciting aspects of metal detecting. For more information, check out MetalDetector.com’s Learning Library. Read about these related topics:

Coins, Coins…They’re Everywhere! Here’s How You Can Find Them

MetalDetector.com customer Rick of Dimondale, MI found not one but two 1942 walking liberty half dollar's and in the same hole!

MetalDetector.com customer Rick of Dimondale, MI found not one but two 1942 walking liberty half dollar’s and in the same hole!

For coin-hunting buffs and newer treasure hunters, there is no greater rush than digging up a valuable old coin. Millions of coins worth untold sums are just waiting to be recovered by a hobbyist with a metal detector. So, if you are armed with a metal detector and a bit of enthusiasm, there’s a good chance you’ll unearth a wealth in coins! Some will be clad coins: modern coins with an inner core of copper and outer layers of nickel-copper alloy. But, there are older coins underfoot which are much more valuable and dated. These include: Indianhead and Wheat pennies, Buffalo nickels, Barber dimes, Liberty and Washington quarters, Liberty-walking half dollars and many other types of silver coins. Older silver coins are made of near pure silver, not alloy.

Lost & Buried Gold Coins are a Hot Commodity!

Believe it or not, U.S. gold coins are still found by hobbyists today! The first gold coins issued by the United States Mint started circulating in 1795. From 1838 to 1907, $20 Liberty Head gold coins were minted; followed by $20 Saint Gauden gold coins from 1907 to 1933. These, and other ancient foreign coins are unearthed by coin shooters. Experts say that a dedicated coin hunter can recover from a handful to over a 100 coins on any given weekend. Basic clad coins at “face value” can easily be cashed in at a Coin Star machine. But more importantly, older coins are worth several times their face value. As seasoned hobbyists say, “A single coin can be worth thousands of dollars. But, even a few weekend’s worth of coin shooting can pay for your metal detector.”

Digging Tools Needed for Coin Shooting

When you are setting out to dig up coins, it’s important to figure out which tools you will need. There’s no sense dragging a shovel if you won’t need it. The type of digging tool(s) you’ll need really depends on your soil conditions and the depth of coins. Some areas only require a probe and a screwdriver. But in tough terrain, you may need a small hand shovel or a serrated digger. Serrated diggers, like the Lesche Digging Tool and the Garrett Edge Digger are often a lifesaver when it comes to coin shooting. They are made of high-quality steel for strength and durability; and their serrated edges cut through weeds and brush. Both diggers also come with a sheath that hangs from a belt on your waist.

How to Skillfully Dig Up Coins

When digging up a coin, try not to stick your bare hand into the hole to feel around. Your target may turn out to be a piece of jagged metal. Instead, wear gloves and use your digging tool to bring the soil and target to the surface. Most detectorists like to use the “flap” method to dig up a coin. Using a trowel, cut out three sides of a square into the grass, digging about 3 or 4 inches deep. Then, you use your digging tool to lift the flap up and expose the hole. This leaves one side of the square attached to the rest of the grass, so some of the roots remain intact. This leaves less visible damage and the grass will grow back easily. At this point, you can sift through the soil until you spot your target. Or, as many seasoned hobbyists suggest: a handheld pinpointer makes easy work of finding a coin. Pinpointers, such as the Garrett Pro-Pointer AT and Makro Pointer can be used inside your hole to locate the target or when searching through mounds of dirt you’ve already dug. Upon recovering a coin, do not rub the coin between your fingers. Most soils contain a lot of sand and silica which will scratch the surface. Lastly, be sure to go over the area again with your detector. Some coins are part of a “pocket spill” and it may just be your lucky day!

Got a great “coin find” story to share? Be sure to post your story and a photo of your find on “My Metal Detector Finds.” Here, you can read about amazing finds posted by everyday detectorists. The stories are fascinating and they’ll inspire you to get out treasure hunting!

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5 Types of Antiques Commonly Found By Metal Detectors

We all enjoy things that remind us of our past; and this is one of the many reasons so many different people like to collect antiques. Going antiquing is a favorite hobby for many as well, and, of course, adds to those antique collections! Another way to build an antique collection is to go metal detecting.

While you never know what you’ll find when you’re out metal detecting, it’s almost always something old. You’ll also find that since many objects were made of metal in the past there are a variety of types of antiques you might unearth with a metal detector. The following are five of the most common types of antiques found while metal detecting.

Jewelry

Hair pins, earrings, necklaces, ankle bracelets, you name it, that type of jewelry has been found with a metal detector. Most jewelry has at least one metal part, usually more making it an easy find for a metal detector. Often the gems and stones are still intact as well to make an even more exciting treasure.

Coins

Coins area a very popular metal detecting find.  Many aren’t antiques, but quite a few others are!  And, when you find that Indian Head, or Flying Eagle, “farm fresh”, right out of the ground, it’s so much better than buying it at the antique store there’s no comparison.

Glass Bottles

Believe it or not many types of antique glass bottles have been found by metal detectors. This is possible because although the bottle itself is glass, there is often a metal cap, or closure that the machine will hit on. Antique glass bottles are also often found as part of a treasure cache in which the metal detector located the other metal objects in the cache, or the container itself as opposed to the glass bottles; which ended up to be an unexpected bonus!

Buttons and Buckles

Buttons and buckles were common metal items worn in the past. They’re not common anymore though and when these treasures are found by a metal detector, most antique collectors get very excited!

Toys, Heirlooms and Home Decor

Family heirlooms, precious metal toys and home decor items of the past like picture frames, ornaments, tableware, mirrors, and other objects like these were usually made at least in part from metals and are quite frequently found when out metal detecting. Many individuals enjoy searching for toys with a metal detector. These are exciting finds because they give a unique glimpse into the owner’s life at the time, and life at that period of history in general as well.

These are just five of the many types of antiques that can be found with a metal detector! So, if you enjoy collecting antiques, a metal detector may be just the thing you need to enhance your collection with all kinds of different types of antiques while having fun with a brand new hobby as well.

Related Articles:

Relic Hunting: What are the Best Metal Detectors for Finding Relics?

Coin Hunting: What are the Best Metal Detectors for Finding Coins?