Sell Your Finds! Know the Value of Your Treasure

Sell Your Treasure Finds for Top Dollar! Learn How Now.

Sell Your Treasure Finds for Top Dollar! Learn How Now.

The amazing thing about metal detecting is that you can take this hobby into so many different directions. Whether you’re a land or water hunter, your treasure finds are all valuable. What you do with your treasure finds is entirely up to YOU. Some hobbyists drop all of their coins into a big jug to save for their next vacation. Others display collections of old coins, jewelry and relics in their home. Relic hunters are known to loan items to local museums. And lots of detectorists sell valuable finds for a profit! You can earn extra income—all while participating in a hobby you love! If you are looking to make some money on your finds, there’s a few things you need to know before you sell:

  1. Correctly identify your find
  2. Get an estimate of its value
  3. Decide where to sell the item

Identify What You have Found!

This can be the tricky part. Let’s say you’ve found an old belt buckle. Is it just an ordinary men’s buckle or is it from a Revelutionary or Civil War soldier’s uniform? And what condition is it in? These are big factors in determining the buckle’s value. Our suggestion is to research your object before getting an estimate to sell. For example, if you have uncovered a piece of silver with markings, try to identify the manufacturer. Then, you can determine its age and value. Contact a local appraiser to ballpark your object’s worth. You can also post a photo of your find in a metal detecting community forum. Members are happy to help you identify your find.

Get an Estimate of Your Treasures’ Value

With 14- and 18-karat jewelry, you will see markings on the pieces of jewelry. You can look up these markings on the internet to see what it’s worth. To determine a coin’s worth, check popular websites such as NGC from the American Numismatic Association.

Where to Sell Your Treasure  

It’s easy to find a buyer online. Research high-quality coin and relics dealers that operate on the internet. There are online dealers that have been buying and selling coins, gold and silver through the mail for decades. If you want to sell gold/platinum/silver for melt, it is best to do it locally in person. Tip: Take the same item to several different jewelers and see who offers the best price.

 

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What are the Best Metal Detectors for Finding Coins?

What are the Best Metal Detectors for Finding Relics?

Old Coins are Hiding, and YOU Can Find Them!

1921 Silver Dollar found with a metal detector.

1921 Silver Dollar found with a metal detector.

Detectorists who focus on hunting coins (“coin shooters”) are on a quest for older, more valuable coins. Some hobbyists display their own collection and others sell coins for a profit. What distinguishes an “old” coin from a newer clad coin? It’s their silver content. According to the American Rare Coin website, “Roosevelt and Mercury Dimes, Washington Quarters, and Walking Liberty Franklin and Kennedy Half-Dollars minted in 1964 and earlier are 90% silver.”  All dimes and quarters minted after 1964 are not made with silver. Newer coins are made of an alloy, or a mixture of metals.

Experts say that success in finding older coins depends on your creativity in finding the right hunting spots. Scouting out a unique location is very significant. For example, parks, beaches and music venues will often yield new coins, but if you are searching for Mercury dimes, Morgan silver dollars or centuries-old $5 gold pieces, you’ll need a great spot! Researching historical records will give you clues about past locations that are worth exploring.

Experienced Coin Hunters Weigh in on Where to Find Old Coins

Avid coin hunters love to share their success stories. And in detecting forums, they give advice to new hobbyists and coin hunters!

Bob from Illinois offers this BRILLIANT tip:

  • “Talk to anyone over 60 years old. Ask them where they played when they were kids. They were growing up before 1964. Ask where the swimming hole was, the shortcuts to school, and if that school that was torn down? Inquire about older parks and fair grounds. Do they know areas that are overgrown now that were homes in the past? I have gained many silvers this way!”

Marty from Georgia says:

  • “All my old coins have come from private property. When I’m searching, I think of where people would chill scores of years ago. A/C wasn’t affordable “back in the day.” Shade trees and the Southern edges of property lines with trees are the best. Try thinking like a 130 year old!

‘Coin Guy’ has this advice:

  • “Old houses. I knock on the door and ask. 7 out of 10 property owners say yes. Be friendly and you can have old silver coins in your pocket. At one old house that was already searched, I found a 1904 dime and 5 Indian-  plus several Wheaties.”

Interested in a metal detector that will find old coins? Please read our Learning Library article, “What are the Best Metal Detectors for Finding Coins?” to help you make the best selection!

Coins, Coins…They’re Everywhere! Here’s How You Can Find Them

MetalDetector.com customer Rick of Dimondale, MI found not one but two 1942 walking liberty half dollar's and in the same hole!

MetalDetector.com customer Rick of Dimondale, MI found not one but two 1942 walking liberty half dollar’s and in the same hole!

For coin-hunting buffs and newer treasure hunters, there is no greater rush than digging up a valuable old coin. Millions of coins worth untold sums are just waiting to be recovered by a hobbyist with a metal detector. So, if you are armed with a metal detector and a bit of enthusiasm, there’s a good chance you’ll unearth a wealth in coins! Some will be clad coins: modern coins with an inner core of copper and outer layers of nickel-copper alloy. But, there are older coins underfoot which are much more valuable and dated. These include: Indianhead and Wheat pennies, Buffalo nickels, Barber dimes, Liberty and Washington quarters, Liberty-walking half dollars and many other types of silver coins. Older silver coins are made of near pure silver, not alloy.

Lost & Buried Gold Coins are a Hot Commodity!

Believe it or not, U.S. gold coins are still found by hobbyists today! The first gold coins issued by the United States Mint started circulating in 1795. From 1838 to 1907, $20 Liberty Head gold coins were minted; followed by $20 Saint Gauden gold coins from 1907 to 1933. These, and other ancient foreign coins are unearthed by coin shooters. Experts say that a dedicated coin hunter can recover from a handful to over a 100 coins on any given weekend. Basic clad coins at “face value” can easily be cashed in at a Coin Star machine. But more importantly, older coins are worth several times their face value. As seasoned hobbyists say, “A single coin can be worth thousands of dollars. But, even a few weekend’s worth of coin shooting can pay for your metal detector.”

Digging Tools Needed for Coin Shooting

When you are setting out to dig up coins, it’s important to figure out which tools you will need. There’s no sense dragging a shovel if you won’t need it. The type of digging tool(s) you’ll need really depends on your soil conditions and the depth of coins. Some areas only require a probe and a screwdriver. But in tough terrain, you may need a small hand shovel or a serrated digger. Serrated diggers, like the Lesche Digging Tool and the Garrett Edge Digger are often a lifesaver when it comes to coin shooting. They are made of high-quality steel for strength and durability; and their serrated edges cut through weeds and brush. Both diggers also come with a sheath that hangs from a belt on your waist.

How to Skillfully Dig Up Coins

When digging up a coin, try not to stick your bare hand into the hole to feel around. Your target may turn out to be a piece of jagged metal. Instead, wear gloves and use your digging tool to bring the soil and target to the surface. Most detectorists like to use the “flap” method to dig up a coin. Using a trowel, cut out three sides of a square into the grass, digging about 3 or 4 inches deep. Then, you use your digging tool to lift the flap up and expose the hole. This leaves one side of the square attached to the rest of the grass, so some of the roots remain intact. This leaves less visible damage and the grass will grow back easily. At this point, you can sift through the soil until you spot your target. Or, as many seasoned hobbyists suggest: a handheld pinpointer makes easy work of finding a coin. Pinpointers, such as the Garrett Pro-Pointer AT and Makro Pointer can be used inside your hole to locate the target or when searching through mounds of dirt you’ve already dug. Upon recovering a coin, do not rub the coin between your fingers. Most soils contain a lot of sand and silica which will scratch the surface. Lastly, be sure to go over the area again with your detector. Some coins are part of a “pocket spill” and it may just be your lucky day!

Got a great “coin find” story to share? Be sure to post your story and a photo of your find on “My Metal Detector Finds.” Here, you can read about amazing finds posted by everyday detectorists. The stories are fascinating and they’ll inspire you to get out treasure hunting!

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