Free Pinpointer with Any Purchase of $300! Learn Why Metal Detector Pinpointers are Essential

Find your target two to three times faster.

A pinpointer will allow you to find your target two to three times faster.

If you are new to the hobby of metal detecting—congratulations! Exciting adventures await for you. As you start locating metal targets, you will soon see that pinpointing them can be challenging. Your detector will signal, but you will probably dig up hole after hole before finding your target. This can get frustrating, which is why experts strongly recommend utilizing a detecting pinpointer.

Why Experts Recommend Pinpointers

Detectorist Phil Goodson says , “Even if your metal detector has ‘pinpoint mode’, a hand-held pinpointer is worth EVERY penny! It’s a valuable tool that saves you time, effort, and money.”  It also cuts down on your digging time. He points out that a pinpointer narrows your search area to an inch or so for quickly locating a small coin or piece of jewelry. Goodson says on his first time out detecting, he found a gold ring, because his brother handed him a pinpointer. “There was only grass under the coil. Using my brother’s pinpointer, I was able to zero in on my target. I cut a small plug of grass and soil and started to pull it apart. I noticed a small strip of yellow metal about 1/4 inch wide embedded in the clay. I showed my brother, who said, “Are you kidding me?” “That’s gold! You’ve found your first gold ring!” This is how the passion of metal detecting begins!

Pinpointers on Sale at MetalDetector.com

MetalDetector.com stocks the best, most popular pinpointers on the market! Right now, the Garrett Pro-Pinpointer II and Garrett Pro-Pointer AT are sale-priced, as well as the Makro Pointer and White’s Bullseye TRX. Be sure to check out the new XP MI-4 Pinpointer, with great features it’s a value you simply can’t afford to miss.

FREE PINPOINTER- Free with any Purchase of $300 or More. (Discount shown in cart)

The Bounty Hunter Pinpointer pinpoints the exact location of buried metal objects to less than an inch. While the units mentioned above offer greater performance, this Pinpointer was designed to be used with any metal detector to help precisely locate coins and other treasures. It’s a great way to see for yourself if investing in one of the top units we have spoken about today would be right for you.

Note: See all models of Pinpointers here.

 

Related Articles:

What are the Best Metal Detector Pinpointers?

 

Coins, Coins…They’re Everywhere! Here’s How You Can Find Them

MetalDetector.com customer Rick of Dimondale, MI found not one but two 1942 walking liberty half dollar's and in the same hole!

MetalDetector.com customer Rick of Dimondale, MI found not one but two 1942 walking liberty half dollar’s and in the same hole!

For coin-hunting buffs and newer treasure hunters, there is no greater rush than digging up a valuable old coin. Millions of coins worth untold sums are just waiting to be recovered by a hobbyist with a metal detector. So, if you are armed with a metal detector and a bit of enthusiasm, there’s a good chance you’ll unearth a wealth in coins! Some will be clad coins: modern coins with an inner core of copper and outer layers of nickel-copper alloy. But, there are older coins underfoot which are much more valuable and dated. These include: Indianhead and Wheat pennies, Buffalo nickels, Barber dimes, Liberty and Washington quarters, Liberty-walking half dollars and many other types of silver coins. Older silver coins are made of near pure silver, not alloy.

Lost & Buried Gold Coins are a Hot Commodity!

Believe it or not, U.S. gold coins are still found by hobbyists today! The first gold coins issued by the United States Mint started circulating in 1795. From 1838 to 1907, $20 Liberty Head gold coins were minted; followed by $20 Saint Gauden gold coins from 1907 to 1933. These, and other ancient foreign coins are unearthed by coin shooters. Experts say that a dedicated coin hunter can recover from a handful to over a 100 coins on any given weekend. Basic clad coins at “face value” can easily be cashed in at a Coin Star machine. But more importantly, older coins are worth several times their face value. As seasoned hobbyists say, “A single coin can be worth thousands of dollars. But, even a few weekend’s worth of coin shooting can pay for your metal detector.”

Digging Tools Needed for Coin Shooting

When you are setting out to dig up coins, it’s important to figure out which tools you will need. There’s no sense dragging a shovel if you won’t need it. The type of digging tool(s) you’ll need really depends on your soil conditions and the depth of coins. Some areas only require a probe and a screwdriver. But in tough terrain, you may need a small hand shovel or a serrated digger. Serrated diggers, like the Lesche Digging Tool and the Garrett Edge Digger are often a lifesaver when it comes to coin shooting. They are made of high-quality steel for strength and durability; and their serrated edges cut through weeds and brush. Both diggers also come with a sheath that hangs from a belt on your waist.

How to Skillfully Dig Up Coins

When digging up a coin, try not to stick your bare hand into the hole to feel around. Your target may turn out to be a piece of jagged metal. Instead, wear gloves and use your digging tool to bring the soil and target to the surface. Most detectorists like to use the “flap” method to dig up a coin. Using a trowel, cut out three sides of a square into the grass, digging about 3 or 4 inches deep. Then, you use your digging tool to lift the flap up and expose the hole. This leaves one side of the square attached to the rest of the grass, so some of the roots remain intact. This leaves less visible damage and the grass will grow back easily. At this point, you can sift through the soil until you spot your target. Or, as many seasoned hobbyists suggest: a handheld pinpointer makes easy work of finding a coin. Pinpointers, such as the Garrett Pro-Pointer AT and Makro Pointer can be used inside your hole to locate the target or when searching through mounds of dirt you’ve already dug. Upon recovering a coin, do not rub the coin between your fingers. Most soils contain a lot of sand and silica which will scratch the surface. Lastly, be sure to go over the area again with your detector. Some coins are part of a “pocket spill” and it may just be your lucky day!

Got a great “coin find” story to share? Be sure to post your story and a photo of your find on “My Metal Detector Finds.” Here, you can read about amazing finds posted by everyday detectorists. The stories are fascinating and they’ll inspire you to get out treasure hunting!

Related Articles:

Metal Detecting Diggers, Pinpointers and Headphones

Having that extra accessory item to go along with your new metal detector can make a big difference in your overall success.

Having that extra accessory item to go along with your new metal detector can make a big difference in your overall success.

If you’ve just purchased or received your first metal detector during the holiday season: Congratulations! You are about to embark upon the most exciting hobby of your life! The first order of business is to read over your owner’s manual and detect a little bit in your own yard. Secondly, you should consider what other equipment you may need to make your detecting adventures easier and more successful.

Although most accessories are optional, there are definitely tools that make this hobby more enjoyable. Among them, you will need some kind of digger to retrieve your finds. Some detectorists use diggers as simple as a screwdriver or small gardening tool, but when you are recovering deep treasures in rough turf, you may need a full-sized detecting shovel. Hand-held pinpointers make finding coins and relics a lot faster. Most detectors have a pinpoint mode, but the hand-held units fit easily inside the hole as you dig, making for speedy target retrieval. Headphones not only save on your battery power, but they allow you to  hear faint signals—which is really important!

Metal Detecting Pinpointers

A small pinpointing probe is one of the most useful pieces of  equipment that you can carry. Pinpointers are little detectors in themselves; and their job is  to check the inside of your hole to precisely locate the target you are digging. Metal detecting pinpointers save you time and  frustration, along with objects that you would otherwise lose. You’ll hear stories from other detectorists about targets they couldn’t find after extensive searching and why they never leave home without a pinpointer. The Garrett Pro-Pinpointer II and Garrett Pro-Pointer AT are excellent models as well as the Makro Pointer and White’s Bullseye TRX.

Hand-Held Diggers and Shovels

You really can’t do without some type of a digger when metal detecting. Remember—holes need to be dug conspicuously and thoroughly covered up afterwards. This is especially true when digging on private property! Detectorists are always worried about fellow hobbyists ruining the future of detecting by leaving messes and holes behind. Diggers come in many shapes and sizes, from  small hand trowels to industrial garden spades. They are normally made of stainless steel, either with the head welded to the shaft or made all in one. It’s important to use a sharp implement that will do the job and will not leave you with an unwieldy hole…The ideal size for the blade is about 4 inches across, and about 5-6 inches high. Among the most popular diggers is the Lesche digger with a serrated edge—it is designed to easily cut through roots and tough ground conditions.

metal detecting headphones

hobbyists and professional metal detectorists alike choose to have a quality pair of metal detecting headphones.

Detecting Headphones

Headphones should always be used as they enable you  to hear the faint signals; not just the obvious loud ones. Detecting without headphones in public areas may disturb other people and draw attention to yourself. There are many high-quality detecting headphones on the market, and they are very affordable. Experts recommend buying the best pair you can afford without  breaking the bank. You’ll find a variety of metal detecting headphones at all different price points.

Belt Pouches and Kneepads

A pouch that has a few different compartments is very handy as you don’t want your good finds mixed up with junk targets. Hobbyists often say they keep coins in one pocket, relics and other items in the other and tools in the third pocket.  Also, a few small plastic bags are useful for smaller, valuable finds. Many detectorists recommend kneepads for kneeling down on rocky or rough ground. It really depends on your digging style, and you’ll discover what works best for you as you get into the hobby!

Related Articles:

What are the Best Metal Detector Pinpointers?

What are the Best Digging Trowels and Shovels for Metal Detecting?

Choosing a Metal Detector Headphone