10 Best Spots to Find Treasure at Your Local Park!

Marcus found this 1754 1/2 Reale coin near older trees while metal detecting in a local park.

Marcus found this 1754 1/2 Reale coin near older trees while metal detecting in a local park.

The local park is usually the FIRST place hobbyists start detecting, and parks can be very lucrative when it comes to metal detecting. Finding treasure in your own neighborhood—right down the street—is exciting because this is the history of your city. Amazingly, people have found some of their best treasures at the park—including YouTuber “Mark D.”, who hunts with his Garrett AT Pro, and found a diamond and ruby brooch in Denver, CO. He also got an “80” signal on his detector, which was a copper memorial, right next to a Mercury dime. Mark uses his Garrett Pro-Pointer to pinpoint targets, after getting a signal from his detector.

Some people say that popular area’s in parks are “hunted out” after years of metal detecting, but don’t be deterred. Experts say if you follow a few valuable tips, you will most certainly be successful hunting your favorite local park!

Hunt These Areas at Your Local Park

  1. Outer Edges of the Park: Older coins are often found at the outer edges of the park. Why? Grass is usually only mowed in the modern sections of the park. However, people also frequented the outer edges of the park many years ago. This is where lost coins and jewelry are lying.
  2. Under Large Trees: There are always treasures around park trees, especially where the shade is. Hunt the shady side of trees that are near volleyball courts, baseball diamonds and activity areas.
  3. Volleyball Courts: You will find lots of jewelry and coins in the sand of a volleyball court. Players use suntan lotion, which loosens rings; while other jewelry can simply fall off.
  4. Park Pools: It’s always a “given” that people lose jewelry and coins around the pool. They take off watches and necklaces and inadvertently leave them behind.
  5. Picnic Areas: Groups of people leave all sorts of things where they lay down blankets in the summertime. “Music in the Park” is a festive evening activity, where coins and valuables are later discovered.
  6. Ball Fields: Especially if they are old fields where games were played many years ago. Spectators dropped old coins, possibly from a century ago!
  7. Gazebos: This is the site of group photos, including wedding and graduation photos. Where there are people, there are lost valuables.
  8. Play Areas: Perhaps the most obvious search spots are the playgrounds, or tot lots at the park. It’s mostly the parents losing items here, such as rings and coins.
  9. Dirt Piles: Don’t pass up these areas where trail repair projects or construction is happening. Old dirt equals easy finds!
  10. Grass by the Parking Lot: Search the grassy area leading to the parking lot. This is where people are digging for their car keys, while other things (including coins) fall out of their pockets.

Related Article – Best Metal Detectors for Finding Coins and Jewelry.

Learn How to Read the Soil for Treasures Below

Learn to read the soil and find more treasures with deep seeking detectors such as the Garrett GTI 2500 with Depth Multiplier.

Learn to read the soil and find more treasures with deep seeking detectors such as the Garrett GTI 2500 with Depth Multiplier.

Did you know that you can learn how to “read the soil” you’re digging in to determine if there is treasure below? Treasure hunter Bill Gallagher explains in Lost Treasure Magazine that there are many clues to guide you. By reading the soil, Gallagher discovered that all of his treasure is often contained in one layer. So, getting to know the earth’s layers will definitely help with your success!

Soil Indicators of Buried Treasure

Pure colored sand and dirt usually means an area is undisturbed. However, variations in the soil like circles, dots and layers of multicolored soil indicate the opposite—people may have buried treasure here. Detectorists who are on the hunt for old dump sites and privy pits read the land and soil in search of old trash. An old piece of glass can signal a dump site below. The top layer of trash usually contains nails, tin cans, and old household items—which a metal detector will quickly locate.

Where is the Treasure Layer?

Gallagher suggests digging a few test holes in the area you’re getting a signal. “Get a good look at a cross section of topsoil, and try to find the treasure layer. In a fort site nearby, I found a thin black line below many layers of soil. It was chock full of buttons, coins and musket balls. Concentrate on finding the “Pay” dirt layer to maximize your finds.” Instead of spending hours sifting through all of the layers, find the good layer where most of the treasures have settled. Another tip is to treasure hunt where industrial digging is going on. Ditches and trenches are great places to search because the treasure layer may now be uncovered.

It’s all about detecting in the most productive way possible. If you develop your ability to read the soil, you will find the MOST amount of treasure in the least time possible!

 

Find More Treasure with these Related Articles:

Hint, Hint… I Would Love a Metal Detector this Year!

The holidays are just around the corner…time to drop hints about what you want for Christmas or Hanukkah! Don’t be shy—relatives are going to buy you gifts anyhow. You might as well ask for what you really want. A metal detector is the perfect gift and entry-level models are reasonably priced. People can expect to spend between $150 to $300 for an entry-level detector or a bit more for a mid-level unit. General purpose detectors for beginners have all the functions you need to get started. If the budget warrants, add more features by choosing an advanced all-terrain model, such as the Garrett AT Pro. There are more detectors to choose from and a great place to start are with the buying guide articles and metal detector reviews found in our Learning Library of Metal Detectors.

What types of treasure can you expect to find as a beginning hobbyist? Clad coins, (which are the more recent coins), are easy to find. Pennies and dimes are a dime a dozen when detecting in a park. Older coins can be located if you are in an area that dates back a century or two in history. One detectorist who found a British Copper from the late 1700’s cherishes the coin because she imagined it being held by a new settler to this country. Old homesteads are a great place to dig because you can find relics and old coins all in one place. Some old cellar holes turn up old coins, jewelry and farm equipment and old embossed bottles. To learn more about common metal detector finds and where to search, here’s a helpful article: Where to Find Treasure.

 

Best Places to Treasure Hunt with Your Metal Detector

Treasure Hunting Tips

When treasure hunting, two of the most important things are knowing where to search and having the right metal detector to help you.

When you’re eager to find lost coins, jewelry, relics and treasure—the first question in your mind is “where should I hunt?” Obvious spots are probably right under your nose and it’s prudent to get suggestions from veteran treasure hunters. After all, they’ve been experimenting with metal detectors for years and know where to find success. If you’re a fan of the National Geographic TV show Diggers, you’ve heard KG and Ringy talk about finding ‘nectar.’ This refers to the millions of dollars in coins and artifacts that sit just below our feet. So, with metal detector in hand—you’re probably ready to find some valuable nectar yourself. Here are suggestions from the experts for potentially successful metal detecting spots:

Public Parks & Recreation areas – search around drinking fountains, benches, picnic tables, walkways, entertainment platforms & pavilions. When metal detecting on private property you need to get permission from the land owner. With that said, amusement parks, fairgrounds, carnival & circus sites can be great spots to search. Any areas where lots of people have gathered over the years such as sports stadiums are great sites. You can check around the buildings, in the parking lot and even beneath stadium seats!

When metal detecting, it is important to learn about the local and national laws before setting out on your hunt. National treasure hunting organizations and local treasure hunting clubs can provide information on the current laws, rules and regulations. Other top sites to explore include:

  • – Beach swimming areas and public pools – especially concession and play areas
  • – Swimming pools and swimming holes
  • – Fishing piers, boat ramps and landings
  • – Horse and hiking trails, campgrounds and children’s camps
  • – Schools and colleges – around playground equipment, water fountains and doors or where people wait in line
  • – Tourist and rest stops lookouts and scenic spots
  • – Wishing wells and fountains- search below ponds or water where people pitch coins
  • – Service stations – don’t forget older and abandoned gas stations
  • – Old drive-in theater locations – search around ticket windows and concession areas
  • – Motels and hotels- current and former locations
  • – Old buildings and abandoned homes – doorways, next to porches and steps, near mailboxes and along all walkways and paths
  • – Your own yard – you will be surprised what you can recover from your own backyard!

These are just a few ideas for treasure hunting locations. You can also visit your local library and do a little research on local history. Perhaps you’ll stumble across information about rumored treasure caches or the sites of old buildings. This may provide you with a list of spots that could yield quantities of old and valuable treasure. If you’re new to the hobby of metal detecting, check out the articles at MetalDetector.com that cover beginner basics, such as Digging Into Research at Your Local Library- Uncovering the Best Sites for Locating Treasures.

MetalDetector.com Supports US Troops Abroad with Free APO/FPO Shipping

Some of the $8,000 in treasure located by MetalDetector.com customer.

Pictured above are some of the over $8,000 in rings, coins and other jewelry found by MetalDetector.com customer John M from Texas.

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To the staff and owners of Metaldetector.com,

I would like to thank you for your “Support of the Troops.” I ordered a sand scoop from you about 5 or 6 months ago. I had a very hard time finding a store that would ship to an APO.

When I ordered the scoop on eBay from you, eBay charged me the shipping and your store said free shipping to an APO. I had asked that you just throw in a poncho for me and we’ll call it even. You sent me the poncho and refunded my shipping, which I thought was very commendable.

I have been in the Army for over 27 years, and found this hobby to be a lot of fun in Japan. I hit almost every beach on the Island and some off Island, like Tokashiki and Zumami Island. My wife supports me in my hobby and asked me yesterday if I would like a new metal detector. After-all, I probably found over $8,000 worth of Japanese clad and jewelry; 18K gold rings, 2 Platinum rings, a 5 gram gold ingot, rings with gems, solid gold pendants, silver rings and many other fine items.

I was able to find the owners of a few wedding bands and return them. That sand scoop you sent me worked like a charm. I will order my new Gold Bug 2 today from your store for two reasons; 1. Too return the support you gave me and 2. You have the best prices out there!

Thank You! Sincerely,

John M from Texas